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The benefits and delights of growing Citrus indoors are numerous. For starters, these small trees with glossy green leaves are lovely to look at. When in flower, the scent of their blossoms is pure heaven. Then, of course, there is fresh, homegrown fruit to enjoy. A few easy tips will help you succeed in maintaining a healthy and productive Citrus plant.

When you receive your plant, do not be alarmed if it begins to drop flowers, fruit, and/or foliage, as this is the plant’s reaction to being shipped. Citrus plants need at least 4–6 weeks to acclimate to a new location and this acclimation can take longer if the plant is receiving less than 6 hours of direct sun per day. During this time, DO NOT fertilize the plant, as this will cause further stress. Once the plant is acclimated—which means the plant is able to produce and maintain new growth—you can begin fertilizing according to our recommendations mentioned below.

The juice of Key Lime (Citrus aurantiifolia) gives a sparkling tang to pies as well as Mediterranean, Mexican, and Asian recipes. (It will also spruce up any drink from ice-cold water to something stiffer.)

In most of the United States, these plants must be grown indoors, at least during the winter. Fortunately, their rootstock will keep them a manageable size (to no more than 4–5′ in a container), so they can summer on the patio and spend the winter in a greenhouse, an enclosed porch, or near a sunny, south-facing window. Move the plant outdoors in late spring if you’d like, but wait until the weather is warm and settled.

Gardeners in Zone 10 and warmer can grow Calamondin Orange and ‘Meyer Improved’ Lemon outdoors. ‘Meyer Improved’ Lemon is hardy in Zone 9 as well. Set the pot outdoors in a sheltered, lightly shaded spot, increasing the exposure to sun and wind each day. Check the moisture of the potting mix and water thoroughly if it’s dry. At the end of one week (give or take a day or two), your plant will be ready to go in the ground. Choose a spot for your plant that receives full sun (at least 6 hours of direct sun each day) and is protected from drying winds. Planted in the ground, our Citrus will grow approximately 10′ tall.

‘Meyer Improved’ is a hybrid between a Lemon and an Orange, which makes it a little sweeter than regular Lemons. It’s also a prolific bearer. You’ll enjoy the heavenly scent from luscious blooms followed by fruit in midwinter.

Since Citrus plants are heavy feeders, we include a nutrient spray and a slow-release fertilizer with all varieties. For the nutrient spray: Once your plant has acclimated to its new home (about 4-6 weeks from receipt of plant) and when it is warm enough to spray your plant outdoors in your area, add all of the product to 4 oz of water in a spray bottle (not included). Move the plant to a shady location and spray the leaves. Avoid spraying the blooms. Apply weekly until gone. For the slow-release fertilizer: Once your plant has acclimated to its new home (about 4-6 weeks from receipt), uniformly spread complete package contents on the soil at the base of your plant. Do not mix with water or apply to foliage.

Prune Citrus at any time of the year except winter. Pinch growing tips and cut back leggy branches to help a spindly tree fill out. Suckers (shoots growing from below the graft or emerging from the soil) should be cut back as soon as they’re noticed.

To learn more, watch our short video “How to Grow Citrus Plants” below.

If you’ve spent any time on our , or read any of our catalogs, you’ve likely encountered the term “hardiness zone.” We’d like to de-mystify this term a bit, and explain how location should play into your selection of plants.

What Is a Hardiness Zone?

Using historical temperature data, the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) has divided the country into 13 hardiness zones, ranging from 1 (coldest) to 13 (warmest). Each of these zones is further divided into “A” and “B” for greater accuracy, with A being colder than B. Click to see the USDA’s hardiness zone map. These zones are defined by average annual minimum temperatures. For example, a zip code in which the average annual minimum temperature is between -15 and -10 Fahrenheit is assigned to hardiness zone 5B.

The idea behind the map is that a gardener may look up his or her hardiness zone and use it to identify plants that will thrive in their area. For example, a gardener in Northwest Connecticut (hardiness zone 5) may confidently plant a variety that has been rated hardy to zone 4 but would generally not plant a variety that is rated hardy only to zone 6, because the zone 6 plant is not likely to survive the typical winter in that area.

How To Find & Use Your Hardiness Zone on WhiteFlowerFarm.com

First, go to www.whiteflowerfarm.com. At the top of our home page, just under the Search box, click on Find Your Hardiness Zone and enter your zip code in the box that appears, then click on Look Up. When the page reappears, your zone number will be listed at the top of the page (in the spot previously occupied by Find Your Hardiness Zone). As you navigate our site, use the filters on the left side of the page to narrow down a listing to display only plants that will thrive in your zone.

If you choose a plant or plants that are not considered hardy in your zone, our will offer a gentle warning at checkout. This is not intended to dissuade you (in fact, plants can sometimes be “pushed” to grow outside their hardiness zones), but we wish to help you avoid any possible disappointment if a plant fails to perform well due to a climate mismatch. Please be aware that we cannot honor our usual guarantee on plants that have been shipped outside of their suggested hardiness range.

Sometimes Hardiness Ratings Include “S” or “W” – What Does This Mean?

When listing the hardiness range of a plant, we often “split” the warm end of the range—for example, you might see a plant listed as Hardiness Zone: 3-8S/10W. In this instance, the 3 refers to the “cold hardiness” of the plant—all else equal, this variety should overwinter successfully in zone 3. The 8S refers to the humid Southeast (the ‘S’ being for ‘South’) and the 10W (‘W’ for ‘West’) to the comparatively dry Pacific Coast states of CA, OR, and WA—this plant can tolerate zone 8 temperatures in the South, and zone 10 temperatures on the West coast. In Northern climates, summer heat is not typically a consideration.

So to summarize—a plant listed as 3-8S/10W should successfully overwinter in zones 3 or warmer, tolerate humid heat up to zone 8, and tolerate dry heat up to zone 10.

We realize this is complicated; the problem is that the USDA zones are really not sufficiently specific. For example, our nursery in Connecticut is in the same hardiness zone as Taos, NM—a climate that could hardly be more different than ours. Furthermore, there are innumerable other variables that may determine how a plant fares in a given site. We find that customers, over time, gain a good understanding of which plants do and don’t work for them, and that this understanding is much more helpful than a strict reliance on hardiness zone. When in doubt, please —our customer service team is extremely knowledgeable and ready to assist.

We start the holiday season with over 70 Amaryllis varieties, including Singles, Doubles, Nymphs, Small-Flowered Varieties and Cybisters in a dazzling range of colors. Our Amaryllis bulbs are the top size commercially available (larger than what is generally seen at retail stores) and have been fully prepared at the proper temperature. Given warm temperatures, strong light, and water upon arrival, they will put on a spectacular show that will brighten up even the gloomiest winter day. Scroll below to see the wide range of varieties and colors available.

The 5″ double red blossoms of Amaryllis Fanfare® are very flared, very full, and very ruffled.

produce the same large, richly colored blooms as their Dutch cousins, but on an earlier timetable. Because bulbs grown in the Southern Hemisphere mature sooner in the year, we begin filling orders in October, and South African varieties will bloom about 6-8 weeks from receipt, often in time for the holidays.

Cybister Amaryllis produce delicate blooms that look more like wildflowers or dragonflies. These reliable growers will delight you with their colorful yet exotic flowers.

The blooms of (varieties of the South American species Hippeastrum cybister) look like exotic tropical birds but the bulbs are as floriferous and easy to grow as their bigger cousins. The dramatic Cybister Amaryllis naturally make smaller bulbs and flowers.

The vibrant coral flowers of ‘Sunshine Nymph’ are detailed with pink undertones and white stripes.

are a distinctive, carefully-bred class of Amaryllis with exceptionally large and heavily petaled flowers on very strong stems. As the photos confirm, blooms are nearly as wide as the pots they grow in and each stem is guaranteed to produce four flowers, a rarity among doubles.

These red-and-white, lightly ruffled blooms of ‘Spotlight’ take center stage and light up even the darkest winter days with white lower petals that are etched with dark orange flecks and soft brushstrokes.

Amaryllis flowers come in a variety of colors, or even shades of colors. These types are known as . Bicolor means the Amaryllis flower has two colors on the same bloom.

As iconic as its Hollywood namesake, ‘Marilyn,’ this perfectly proportioned beauty turns heads with voluptuous double white flowers and faint green undertones.

are popular for good reason. Their shapely blooms and rich colors light up a cold day like nothing else we know.

These enormous, open-faced, solid pink blossoms of ‘Lagoon’ cast a spell of tranquil beauty.

Amaryllis flowers come in a variety of shapes and sizes, including varieties. This means they have a single layer of petals that form the flower.

To learn more about , watch our short video below, ‘How to Pot and Care for Amarylls.’

 

The garden staff is busy cleaning and carting away spent annuals, and the foliage and faded blossoms of some perennials and shrubs.Faded annuals, and the foliage and spent blossoms of some perennials and shrubs have been pulled out and are ready to be carted away.

Here in northwestern Connecticut, the fall foliage show is nearing its peak, and in some places, the leaves have begun to fall. They rustle at our feet as we go about our rounds. This is Nature’s way of telling us it’s time to clean the garden.

Clearing out beds and borders means different things to different people. Some gardeners clear every last leaf and past-bloom plant from their gardens while others find reasons to leave everything as is until spring. We fall somewhere in the middle. We believe that maintaining a healthy garden and nutritious, well-structured soil requires different cleanup rituals for different garden spaces. At the farm, here’s how we go about it:

The spent flowers of a Zinnia are beginning to develop mold. Those will be cut and discarded, but for the time being, there is a certain beauty in decay.The spent flowers of a zinnia are beginning to develop mold. They’ll be cut and discarded, but for the time being, there is a certain beauty in decay.

Remove Most Annuals

For starters, we remove most annuals. In general, these plants are easy to spot because after the first hard frost, many of them, including impatiens, begonias, and coleus, have withered and turned brown. If the spent foliage and blossoms on these plants are free of mold and disease, we put them in the compost pile. If we see traces of powdery mildew (zinnias are often afflicted), downy mildew or other diseases, the plants are put into trash that’s hauled off the property. Keep in mind that any mold or disease that’s allowed to stay in the garden will overwinter and reinfect new growth in spring.

Some annuals argue to be removed a bit later in the fall. “If the Cosmos or verbena bonariensis are still green and self-sowing, I will leave them until later,” says nursery manager Barb Pierson. “Plants like Rudbeckia ‘Prairie Sun,’ which can overwinter here, will be left until spring. Kale is pretty late in the season, too.”

Cleaning out the beds beside the store. Rudbeckia 'Prairie Sun' bows out after an exceptional summer performance.Cleaning out the beds beside the store, Rudbeckia ‘Prairie Sun’ bows out after an exceptional summer performance. (Because the plant is sometimes hardy in our zone, some gardeners keep it in to see if it returns in spring.)

Clean Out the Vegetable Garden

In the kitchen garden, Pierson removes all vegetable plants, paying special attention to any varieties, such as tomatoes, that may have fungal leaf spots and mildew. Afflicted plants must be completely removed and put into the garbage (or carted to the dump) or the same afflictions will plague next season’s plants. “Most vegetable plants are best removed unless you are growing fall lettuce or other cold crops here in New England,” Pierson says. “If we plan to plant tulips in the raised beds for a nice spring show, this is the time to do it. If we don’t plant bulbs, we will remove any soil that comes up with the vegetables and add fresh soil in spring. Compost can be added in the fall if it is fresh, but we prefer to do it in the spring because we use fully composted material. Each spring, we replace the top 1/3 of soil – at the least – for best results. Mulching can attract digging rodents so we don’t mulch the beds during the winter months.”

Perennials & Shrubs

In the perennial garden, our methods vary. In the shady beds near the store, our gardeners clean and clear away dead and dying foliage. They cut back ferns, hostas, astilbes, and ligularias. Why? One year, when they let the decaying leaves lie, they discovered that the cushy, warm environment attracted critters who dug around and sometimes nested in the leaf mulch. That would have been all right except the critters didn’t stop at the mulch. They burrowed into the roots of the plants, inadvertently killing a few, and those had to be replaced the following spring.

Browning fern foliage being yanked out and hauled away.Browning fern foliage is yanked out and hauled away.

In areas where critters don’t pose much of a problem, Pierson and many others believe that the decaying leaves of most deciduous trees are beneficial to the garden. For starters, they form a natural leaf mulch that provides insulation for perennials and shrubs. Oak leaves, which are waxy and don’t easily break down, are particularly good for insulation. Mounding them around perennials and shrubs protects the plants from seasonal temperature swings. Pine needles are another fine insulator, and they’re especially good for acid-loving plants including rhododendrons and azaleas. Leaves that break down more readily such as maple, ash and birch leaves add organic nutrients to the soil, and help improve soil structure.

The foliage of Phlox 'Robert Poore' is covered in powdery mildew. The plants need to be cut at the base and removed or the mold will return in spring to re-infect the plants. It won't inhibit the blossoms, but it's not much to look at.The foliage of Phlox ‘Robert Poore’ is covered in powdery mildew. The plants need to be cut at the base and removed or the mold will return in spring to re-infect the plants. It won’t inhibit the blossoms, but it’s not much to look at.

As with annuals and vegetable plants, it’s important to note that any perennials or shrubs that exhibit mold or disease should be cut back, and the spent foliage and blossoms should be carted away to the trash (not the compost pile). Plants like Perovskia (Russian Sage) should not be cut to the ground, Pierson says. “The most important thing to remove is the foliage – not the crown or stems – so I would say remove leaf litter and prune stems as you would for that variety, in general 3-4” above soil level.” Some of the perennials and shrubs most commonly affected by powdery mildew include peonies, monarda (bee balm), phlox, and roses. As with vegetable plants and annuals, if you leave afflicted plants in the garden, the mold and disease will overwinter and reassert itself in spring. The mold won’t interfere with blossom production, but it will detract from the beauty of the foliage.

We like to leave the seed heads of Echinacea in the garden. Birds feed at them, and they also look lovely dusted in snow.We like to leave the seed heads of Echinaceas (Coneflowers) in the garden. Birds feed at them, and they also add winter interest when dusted in snow.

As you cut down bee balms, phlox and peonies, keep in mind that there are other perennials and shrubs you’ll want to keep. While ornamental grasses can be cut back in fall (leaving 6” of growth to protect the crowns), the argument for leaving them until spring is that they look quite lovely dusted in snow. The seed heads of Echinacea and the berries of Ilex verticillata (winterberry) feed the birds as winter sets in. The pods of Asclepias, the flower clusters of Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’ and Eupatorium, and the seed heads of Echinaceas (Coneflowers) all provide winter interest.

Purple kale won't be taken out of the garden until a deep freeze. For now, the intense color adds beauty to the autumn landscape.Purple kale won’t be taken out of the garden until a deep freeze. For now, the intense color adds beauty to the autumn landscape.

So clean as much or as little as you choose depending on the types of plants you have in your garden. But whatever you decide, it’s time to grab your rake and pruners, and spend a few days in the glorious autumn weather putting your garden to bed.

In one of the display gardens, the bright lavender blossoms of the autumn-blooming Colchicum have popped up amid a sea of lime-colored Sedum 'Angelina.' We won't be cutting these!In one of the display gardens, the bright lavender blossoms of the autumn-blooming Colchicum have popped up amid a sea of lime-colored Sedum ‘Angelina.’ We won’t be cutting these!

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Elevate your garden design by incorporating climbing and plants into beds and borders, or by using them to soften fences, walls and wellheads. Smaller climbers, including some varieties, can be used to add vertical interest to container pots or to skirt the trunks of deciduous trees. We offer all of these plants for fall-planting because autumn’s mild weather gives them a chance to settle in under stress-free conditions. They develop root systems before going dormant for winter. When spring comes, they’re poised to begin growing above ground, and they have a nice head start on vines and climbers planted in spring.

Clematis Rosemoor™ Gardini™

When you hang the name of a Royal Horticultural Society garden on a new introduction, it had better be good. Clematis Rosemoor™ Gardini™ is better than good. It comes from Raymond Evison’s superb breeding program on the Isle of Guernsey. Its showy 5″ purplish-red blooms appear on old and new wood, which means flowering is almost nonstop from early summer to fall.

Dawn & Dusk Rose & Clematis Collection

Stunning aerial liaisons can be arranged by pairing two different vines or climbers. We especially like deep purple Clematis ‘Etoile Violette’ with the blush pink, double-flowered ‘New Dawn.’ The Clematis clambers up the Rose’s thorny canes and obligingly places its flowers next to those of its host. When the two are at their peak in early July, the display is pure magic, and both generally offer some repeat bloom through summer. is sweetly fragrant and disease-resistant, especially to black spot, the bane of many Roses.

Clematis Petit Faucon™ Gardini™

Unusual blossoms made up of 4 slender, twisting petals in vivid purple blue with contrasting yellow anthers appear over a long season on this compact, non-clinging vine. At a mature height of 3-4’, it’s ideal for containers, or for climbing over shrubs. Winner of the RHS Award of Garden Merit.

Climbing Hydrangea

Hydrangea is a valuable genus of some 100 species of shrubs and vines grown for their large and very showy flower heads. Hydrangea anomala petiolaris, or as it’s more commonly called, is a vigorous deciduous vine from Japan and Korea whose heart-shaped foliage and large white clusters of June flowers make it an attractive covering for a wall, fence, or large tree.

Rose ‘William Baffin’

has yet to receive the attention it deserves. It bears semidouble, deep pink flowers in abundance in late June, with recurrent bloom well into fall. It is also exceptionally vigorous and hardy, the only recurrent climber available to gardeners in Zones 3 and 4. It’s destined to become one of the most enduring Roses of our era.

Wisteria Lavender Falls

is a genus of deciduous vines whose lovely, fragrant flowers and almost overwhelming vigor make them useful in a wide variety of settings. Wisteria Lavender Falls, originally grown in Oklahoma, is an outstanding variety that has blue-violet, 9–20″ cascading racemes that have the scent of grape jelly. The really exciting part is that they reappear several times during the summer.

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By Ann Travers
White Flower Farm Editor

Few plants deliver such enjoyment in the middle of winter with so little effort from you. Their perfect, diminutive blooms create a composition that’s pure magic.

4 Easy Steps

1. Start with good stock. Purchase top-quality bulbs from a reliable source. We offer an array of Crocus varieties and several mixes designed to provide loads of bright blooms.

2. Planting your bulbs. Use any pot you like to hold Crocus bulbs you plan to force, as long as it allows room for root growth—about 3-4” of space below the bulbs. Pots equipped with drainage holes are favored because they reduce the chances of overwatering bulbs. If you choose a pot without a drainage hole in the bottom, you’ll have to water your bulbs more carefully because bulbs that sit in soggy potting mix will rot.

To pot the bulbs, begin by placing soilless potting mix (available at garden centers) in a plastic tub or bucket. Slowly add water and stir until the mix is evenly moist but not soggy. Add the moistened mix to the container until the pot is about ¾ full. Set the bulbs root-side down on top of the mix. Space them much more closely than you would in the garden—they should almost touch. Then add more mix. Cover the bulbs completely with a ½” layer of mix. Water thoroughly after potting.

3. Chilling the bulbs. To force Crocus bulbs into bloom, you must first encourage them to produce new roots by keeping them cool and moist in a location with temperatures above freezing and rarely rising above 40° for a period of 12-15 weeks. This process simulates the natural conditions that cause Crocuses to bloom, shortening the chilling period (“winter”) by a few weeks. When the pots are brought out of cold storage, the bulbs think spring has arrived and quickly sprout and flower. It’s that easy—the bulbs do most of the work.

The easiest way to chill bulbs is to put them outdoors and let nature do the rest. To insulate the bulbs from rapid changes in air temperature and from freezing cold, bury the pots in a pile of dry leaves held in place by a plastic tarp or in a pile of mulch, such as bark or wood chip, and cover the pile to prevent the formation of a frozen crust. You also can chill bulbs in a cold frame if you’re lucky enough to have one; a cold basement; an old refrigerator; or an unheated garage (provided the temperature doesn’t fall below freezing). Please note: If storing in a refrigerator, make sure there is no fresh fruit inside. The ethylene gas released by fruit can interfere with flower development.

Please note that moisture is as important as temperature in the successful chilling of bulbs. Check the potting mix in the pots every few weeks and water thoroughly when the surface is dry to the touch.

Toward the end of the recommended rooting time, begin checking the pots for signs that the bulbs have rooted. If you see fleshy white roots poking through the drainage holes in the bottom of the pots, the bulbs are usually ready to bloom. If you don’t see roots, give the bulbs more time in cold storage. Don’t judge readiness by the appearance of shoots from the tops of the bulbs; without roots, the bulbs won’t flower properly.

4. Bringing the Bulbs into Bloom
At the end of the chilling period, bring the pots out of cold storage and set them in a bright window in a cool room (one where the temperature stays below 65°F). You’re likely to find that the bulbs have produced white shoots during cold storage. Sunlight quickly turns them green. Water your bulbs when the soil is dry to the touch.

Most Crocus bulbs will bloom 2-5 weeks after they come out of the cold, heralding spring with their bright colors. When the blooms fade, we usually recommend that you toss the bulbs on the compost pile. If you keep them in a sunny window and continue to water them, forced bulbs can be planted in the garden after the threat of hard frost has passed, but they won’t bloom well again for at least 2 years.

Have you ever seen a goldfinch balance on the tip of a Liatris flower spike as it sways in the breeze? Or watched chickadees plucking seeds from the cones of your Echinacea blossoms? Birds enliven any garden with their colors, songs, and antics. They are also an essential part of the food chain. Planting an array of , and will ensure a steady supply of food and keep your feathered friends sheltered over the longest possible season. Highlighted here are some beautiful plants that will help to entice birds to your garden.

Echinacea purpurea Prairie Pillars™ ‘Fragrant Angel’

Lovely has large white blossoms with honey-colored centers that attract birds and other pollinators.  For human admirers, it also offers a sweet perfume.

Callicarpa dichotoma ‘Early Amethyst’

Regarded as one of the best ornamental shrubs for its late-season display of vividly colored berries, shares many attributes of the species—a pleasant, rounded form, long, elliptical leaves, small pink flowers, and bright lavender berries. But this variety sets fruit in early September, well before other varieties.

Ornamental Grass: Schizachyrium scoparium ‘Standing Ovation’

We love this tough for its well-mannered, upright habit and thick blue-green blades. Use it as a vertical exclamation point in borders, or mass it to create a screen. You’ll love watching ground birds who seek cover in its leaves, and songbirds who come to feed on its seed.

Clethra alnifolia Vanilla Spice®

Extra-large white flowers and compact size are outstanding features of this improved variety. The individual florets on are about twice the usual size, blooming in 10–12″ bottlebrush-like panicles, which appear in summer. Their sweet fragrance attracts hummingbirds and butterflies. An excellent choice for the woodland garden or a mixed border.

Lonicera ‘Major Wheeler’

Bring on the hummingbirds! produces a blanket of tubular, reddish orange flowers (coral shades on the West Coast) from late spring through summer. Later, the red berries attract goldfinches and robins. It’s a selection of our native species, Lonicera sempervirens, and plants are both carefree and noninvasive.

Weigela Sonic Bloom® Pink

New lines of breeding have given our beloved Weigelas fresh garden glamour, offering repeat flowering without deadheading. covers itself with blossoms in late spring and follows up with repeated displays until frost. The dozen or so species of the genus Weigela are easy-to-grow, deciduous woodland shrubs from east Asia. Their showy flowers attract hummingbirds and butterflies, and many Weigelas are worth growing in shrub borders or lightly shaded gardens for their foliage effects.

Aronia arbutifolia ‘Brilliantissima’

starts the season as an attractive but understated shrub with glossy leaves and small, fragrant white flowers. In fall, its foliage turns a spectacular scarlet red. It bears bright red berries that begin to take on color in September and persist well into winter, providing much-needed nourishment for birds at a time of year when food is scarce.

 

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Dear Friends,

We have just come through a summer that was largely defined by irregular and extreme climate conditions. The (NOAA) reports that, “Scorching temperatures broke heat records around the world last month [July], which ranked as the fourth warmest July on record. Excessive warmth during the first seven months of 2018 made it the fourth warmest year to date for the planet.” Here in New England, we endured record-setting heat, high humidity, and chronic downpours. Those of us who grew up in the Northeast remember hazy, hot and humid stretches that would last a few days and be followed by a thunderstorm that cleared the air. This year, thunderstorms came and went without refreshing the atmosphere, creating sauna-like conditions referred to by some meteorologists as a “heat dome.” Out West, the story was extreme heat, drought, and fire. According to NOAA, “Death Valley had the hottest month on record observed anywhere.” Other parts of the country and the world also baked.

Our suggestion? Approach your garden with a greater sense of purpose. If you’re unsettled by changes in our weather patterns, plant a tree and urge others to do the same. Leafy specimens are the best air-conditioners and air purifiers we know. The recently noted that “one tree can remove 26 pounds of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere annually, the equivalent of 11,000 miles of car emissions.”

Planting Natives & Lawn Replacements

Monarch butterflies (we count 5 in this photo) feeding on the nectar of Liatris scariosa.

Another way to combat uncomfortable heat levels and changes in climactic conditions is to help creatures great and small that are also being affected by it. Add native plants to your garden and yard to provide habitat and nourishment for birds, pollinators, and other wildlife. In lieu of maintaining a manicured green lawn that often requires chemicals to keep it looking its best, eliminate or reduce the size of your lawn and create a native garden for pollinators. The beauty of these gardens is enhanced by its visitors, which include butterflies of many varieties, and birds. Come spring, we’ll be offering some exciting collections that will help you successfully convert some of your lawn area into a beautiful habitat garden. So begin thinking about where you’d like to site such a garden, and stay tuned for details.

This Bumblebee is enjoying the nectar of Pycnanthemum tenuifolium (slender Mountain Mint).

Record heat around the globe has impacted the lifecycle of the bulbs we offer for fall planting. Higher temps have led to later harvest times in regions including Holland, England, British Columbia, and Japan. That means bulbs produced in these countries will arrive in the U.S. a bit later than usual. Rest assured these top-grade bulbs will be treated with the same consideration that’s required to keep them healthy and strong. They’ll be shipped overseas in temperature-controlled containers then stored here in our warehouse under ideal conditions before being shipped to you for fall planting. We don’t foresee any delays in getting bulbs to you. Order now, and incorporate some of these beautiful flowers in your spring garden.

Going Solar

The solar project is installed at the farm.

At the farm this summer, the big news was the successful installation of our solar array, which means the farm’s offices and greenhouses are now powered by the sun. We’re pleased to have taken this important step in reducing our carbon footprint.

A New Rose Garden

The beginnings of our new Rose Garden, which will feature a variety of Roses and some of their favorite plant companions.

The other big development at the farm this summer was the installation of a new Rose Garden on the site formerly occupied by our Shrub Border. The Rose Garden was designed with the assistance of noted landscape architect and designer Julie Moir Messervy and her talented team at JMMDS (Julie Moir Messervy Design Studio). Site prep began in July, and as of this writing, the garden is in its earliest stages. The bones have been laid out, with pathways delineated, plant groupings sketched in and in some cases planted. Even in skeletal stage, the garden is shaping up to be a most inviting and pleasing space. Several entrances and a winding path welcome visitors to stroll. The short walk will offer a chance to view a wide variety of Roses along with some superb companion plants. Planting of the garden will continue into autumn, and come spring, we’re all looking forward to its first season. We hope you’ll visit soon to have a look at the outline, then plan to return again in spring and summer to see how it progresses. There is no better way to see how new gardens are created and to borrow ideas for inspiration.

Moving the Garden Indoors

Among the season’s new houseplants is the Ruffled Fan Palm, far left, in our Blue Dots Motif cachepot. Did we mention it’s selling like hotcakes?

As the days grow darker at an earlier hour, and the temperatures (finally) begin to cool, those of us who love plants, greenery and flowers are looking for ways to bring the garden indoors for the winter. In our holiday catalog, which soon will be speeding its way to your door, you’ll find some stunning along with , baskets and that show them off to best advantage. (If you care for a sneak peak, many of these items are already on our .) Our hard goods manager has been hard at work, and she’s rounded up some exciting new finds for indoor decorating – from botanically inspired dried in a wide array of styles and color themes to and sachets that carry the natural perfumes of Lavender and other garden favorites, to tiny plants that are ideally sized for table setting, and which make beguiling party favors for autumn and holiday feasts.

Planting in Fall for Next Season’s Display

We trust you and yours are looking forward to autumn and its many pleasant rituals. We’ll be spending as much time as we can in the garden, clearing out beds, adding new perennials and shrubs, planting bulbs, and creating the displays we wish to see next year. As you choose what to plant in your garden this fall, keep in mind that next season’s flower and foliage show is one you’ll likely share with family, friends and, depending how visible your house is to your neighbors, members of your community. Beautiful gardens do much to lift the spirits, bring beauty (and value) to your house and the neighborhood, and, as mentioned above, support pollinators and wildlife. Plant some lovely additions in your yard. It’s a terrific way to make the world a better place, one green oasis at a time.

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With the first few nights of cool, crisp air arriving at last, it’s clear that autumn is on the way. As we begin preparing our gardens for winter, doing yard work and cleanup, it’s also a great time to refresh patio and front porch planters. The fall season comes alive when using colorful combinations to provide an extended display of vibrant blooms and richly textured foliage that will last right up until frost. Spruce up your outdoor spaces for fall festivities and harvest-time holidays including Halloween and Thanksgiving. Pictured below are our new fall container plantings. You may order any of them through our , or use them as inspiration to create your own plantings.

Indian Summer Shrub and Perennial Collection

Spikes of Ornamental Grass ‘Standing Ovation’ introduce a red tone that’s repeated in the foliage of Heucheras ‘Forever Purple’ and ‘Peach Flambe.’ Adding a sprinkle of gold are the yellow-and-green leaves of Euonymus ‘Aureomarginatus’ and the feathery evergreen foliage of False Cypress ‘Sungold.’

Fall Fireworks Collection

Purple Fountain Grass sends up a burst of burgundy foliage followed by a spray of flower spikes in late summer and autumn. It creates a breezy canopy over the single daisies of an Aster and the bronzy purple foliage of an Ajuga.

Autumn Brocade Shrub and Perennial Collection

Anchored by evergreen Arborvitae ‘American Pillar,’ our handsome autumn collection features rich, beautifully textured shades of burgundy Heuchera, blue Juniper, variegated gold-and-green Boxwood, and rosy red Calluna.

Standing Ovation Fall Container Garden

The blue-green flower spikes of an Ornamental Grass stand tall just in time for an autumn show. Supporting the display are the silvery felted leaves of a Stachys, the frosted maroon leaves of a Heuchera, and the white flower spikes of a Calluna.

Autumn Glow Shrub and Perennial Collection

Set the stage for fall with our easy-care combination of 3 harmonious companions. Sure to draw the eye is False Cypress ‘Boulevard,’ with striking blue foliage that serves as a colorful backdrop for the richly hued leaves of Heuchera ‘Peach Flambe.’ Cascading from the pot is Ornamental Grass EverColor® ‘Eversheen,’ each green blade highlighted by a central yellow stripe.

Allium Globemaster

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As visitors stroll the display gardens at the farm, they often ask us about the plants they see in the borders and beds. No plants generate more questions than Alliums. Members of this genus are available in a broad range of colors – from various shades of purple to pink, true blue, yellow, and white, but the hallmark of this family of plants is a form that is both playful and utterly distinctive. Larger cultivars such as Alliums ‘Globemaster,’ form sizeable spheres (in this case 8-10” flower heads) that appear to float like balloons above other plants in the border. Smaller varieties including the delightful Drumstick Allium (Allium sphaerocephalon), produce lollipop-sized orbs on slender stems at a lower height.

The globe-shaped purple flower heads of Allium shown blossoming amid Salvia, Iris and Poppies in the June border.

Alliums are more commonly known as Flowering Onions, a pedestrian name unworthy of these remarkable plants.

Allium caeruleum is a standout for both its color and its form.

It’s worth mentioning that Alliums, like Daffodils, are deer and rodent resistant, thanks to their faint oniony scent. The odor is not noticeable above the ground unless the leaves are cut or bruised, and many of the flowers have an enchanting, sweet scent. There are hundreds of species within this under-appreciated genus, and we annually struggle to restrain ourselves to a reasonable selection. They are reliable perennials when they get good drainage and plenty of sun.

The flower clusters of Allium roseum bulbiferum are less dense than some other cultivars, the pink florets and airy habit adding a graceful presence to the sunny border.

Using Alliums in the Garden

Alliums offer colorful, distinctive, and long-lasting flower forms that are standouts in the early summer garden (there are some fall bloomers as well). They love sun and prefer a well-drained, even sandy, soil as long as it has sufficient nutrients. Tuck the bulbs around clumps of summer-flowering perennials where the Alliums’ withering foliage will be hidden by the expanding perennials. Some combinations we use at the nursery include Allium ‘Globemaster’ among Echinacea (Purple Coneflower); Allium sphaerocephalon (the Drumstick Allium) with Yarrow, Asiatic Lilies, or Phlox; and Allium cristophii (Star of Persia) with Salvia ‘May Night,’ Alchemilla mollis (Lady’s Mantle), or Roses. We offer 5 varieties of the shorter Alliums (10–30″ tall) as A Big Mix of Little Alliums. They look best along the edge of a shrub border or planted in front of late-blooming perennials.

Our popular Red Highlights Collection pairs Drumstick Allium with the reddish-yellow flower clusters of Achillea (Yarrow) ‘Paprika.’

How to Care for Your Allium Bulbs

Light/Watering: Most Alliums grow best in full sun, with at least 6-8 hours of direct sunlight a day. Those we offer require well-drained soil and are longest lived in locations where the soil is on the dry side during summer dormancy.

The large white globes of Allium ‘Mount Everest” are a super choice for a white garden.

Planting: Plant Alliums more shallowly than comparably sized bulbs, just one to two times the diameter of the bulb deep.

Fertilizer/Soil and pH: Alliums prefer well-drained, fertile soil. Fertilize in fall and spring with any bulb fertilizer.

Continuing Care: The leaf tips of many varieties, especially the tall ones, begin to brown before bloom time. Remove the spent flowers (except from varieties that are sterile, such as ‘Globemaster’) if you wish to prevent them from self-sowing.

Pests/Diseases: Alliums have few problems except when planted too shallowly or in wet soil.

Companions: Place Alliums behind heavy-foliage plants such as Peonies and Iris. Good for bedding, and in mixed borders. Flower heads are good for drying.

Alliums pair beautifully with a wide variety of perennials including Echinacea (Coneflower), Phlox, Alchemilla mollis (Lady’s Mantle), Achillea (Yarrow), and Iris. Peonies are another excellent choice. Here a purple-flowering Allium pairs with a white-flowering Peony.

Dividing/Transplanting: Alliums rarely need transplanting or dividing, but this can be done when the bulbs are dormant.




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